Norwich City's 25-man Premier League squad list: Johan Elmander, Gary Hooper and Nathan Redmond feature

Jamie McDonald

Norwich City have announced their 25-man Premier League squad, with new signings Johan Elmander, Gary Hooper and Nathan Redmond all included.

The Canaries also added further firepower in Ricky van Wolfswinkel and Leroy Fer this summer, .

All Barclays Premier League managers had to submit names to the authorities yesterday following the closure of the summer transfer window.

Rules state that clubs can have no more than 17 players who are not deemed to be ‘home grown’, but may have as many U-21 stars as they like.

The Premier League says: "A Home Grown player will be defined as one who, irrespective of his nationality or age, has been registered with any club affiliated to the Football Association or the Football Association of Wales for a period, continuous or not, of three entire seasons or 36 months prior to his 21st birthday (or the end of the season during which he turns 21)."

Changes can be made, however, when the window reopens again on January 1 2014.

And you can find out who features for Norwich City here:

25-man squad list (player name and whether they are ‘home grown’)

Ayala, Daniel Sanchez (Yes)

Bassong Nguena, Sebastian Aymar (No)

Becchio, Luciano Hector (No)

Bennett, Ryan (Yes)

Bunn, Mark John (Yes)

Elmander, Johan Erik Calvin (No)

Fer, Leroy (No)

Fox, David Lee (Yes)

Garrido, Javier (No)

Hoolahan, Wesley (No)

Hooper, Gary (Yes)       

Howson, Jonathan Mark (Yes)

Johnson, Bradley Paul (Yes)

Martin, Russell Kenneth Alexander (Yes)

Nash, Carlo James (Yes)

Olsson, Martin Tony Waikwa (Yes)

Pilkington, Anthony Neil James (Yes)

Ruddy, John Thomas Gordon (Yes)

Snodgrass, Robert (No)

Tettey, Alexander (No)

Turner, Michael Thomas (Yes)

Van Wolfswinkel, Ricky (No)

Whittaker, Steven (No)

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Under-21 players (Contract and Scholars)

Barker, Harry Darius

Browne, Stephen Rhys

Burgess, Ben

Byrne Hewitt, Lewis Christopher

Callan McFadden, Kyle

Cole, Oliver

Eaton Collins, Jamie

Efete, Michee

Fox, Nathan Ross

Gafaiti, Adel

Grant, Raymond Michael

Hall Johnson, Reece

Heath, Harrison

Hodd, Harvey William

King, Cameron

Lokko, Kevin Adom

Loza, Jamar Kasheef

Matthews, Remi Luke

McGeehan, Cameron Alexander

McNeil, Ewan

Morris, Carlton

Murphy, Jacob Kai

Murphy, Joshua

Norman, Cameron

Randall, Henry Charles

Redmond, Nathan Daniel Jerome

Scales, Christian Stephen

Simpson, Jake Mark

Toffolo, Harry

Wyatt, Ben

Young, Roderick Orlando

Southampton's 25-man Premier League squad list: Pablo Osvaldo, Dejan Lovern and Viktor Wanyama feature

Clive Rose

Southampton named their 25-man Premier League squad with .

Manager Mauricio Pochettino has also included his other new faces Dejan Lovern and Viktor Wanyama in the squad.

All Barclays Premier League managers had to submit names to the authorities yesterday following the closure of the summer transfer window.

Rules state that clubs can have no more than 17 players who are not deemed to be ‘home grown’, but may have as many U-21 stars as they like.

The Premier League says: "A Home Grown player will be defined as one who, irrespective of his nationality or age, has been registered with any club affiliated to the Football Association or the Football Association of Wales for a period, continuous or not, of three entire seasons or 36 months prior to his 21st birthday (or the end of the season during which he turns 21)."

Changes can be made, however, when the window reopens again on January 1 2014.

And you can find out who features for Southampton here:

25-man squad list (player name and whether they are ‘home grown’)

Boruc, Artur (No)

Clyne, Nathaniel Edwin (Yes)

Cork, Jack Frank Porteous (Yes)

Davis, Kelvin Geoffery (Yes)

Davis, Steven (Yes)

Do Prado Raymundo, Guilherme (No)

Fonte, Jose Miguel (No)

Fox, Daniel (Yes)

Hooiveld, Jos (No)

Lallana, Adam David (Yes)

Lambert, Rickie Lee (Yes)

Lovren, Dejan (No)

Osvaldo, Pablo Daniel (No)

Ramirez Pereyra, Gaston Exequiel (No)

Rodriguez, Jay Enriqus (Yes)

Schneiderlin, Morgan (Yes)

Wanyama, Victor (No)

Yoshida, Maya (No)

Lee, Tadanari (No)

Barnard, Lee James (Yes)

Forte, Jonathan Ronald James (Yes)

Martin, Aaron (Yes)

Sharp, Billy Louis (Yes)

David Ramos

Under-21 players (Contract and Scholars)

Branker, Jamal Arron Christopher

Britt, William David

Chambers, Calum

Clinton, Kyle

Colmer, Fraser William

Cropper, Cody Joseph

Curtis, Joe Edward

Debayo, Joshua Akinkunmi

Demkiv, Daniel Steven

Flannigan, Jake

Gallagher, Samuel James

Gape, Dominic Edward

Gazzaniga, Paulo Dino

Hesketh, Jake Alexander

Higgins, Charlie

Irvine, Mark Joshua

Isgrove, Lloyd Jeffrey

Isted, Harvey James Duke

Johns, Christopher Patrick Adam

Leggett, Thomas Jacob

Little, Armani

Mason, Niall Aadya

McCarthy, Jason Sean

McQueen, Samuel James

Mells, George John

Moore, Corby James

Mugabi, Bevis Kristofer Kizito

Nehemie, Isaac

Reed, Harrison James

Regis, Christopher

Robinson, Andreas Sonny

Rowe, Omar Reiss

Seager, Ryan Paul

Shaw, Luke Paul Hoare

Sims, Joshua Samuel

Sinclair, Jake Tony

Stephens, Jack

Targett, Matthew Robert

Turnbull, Jordan Robert

Ward Prowse, James Michael Edward

White, James Steven St John

Wood, William Nicholas

Young, Matthew Robert

Stoke City's 25-man Premier League squad list: Stephen Ireland and Marko Arnautovic and Oussame Assaidi feature

facebook.com/stokecity

Mark Hughes has included Stoke City’s deadline-day signings Stephen Ireland and Marko Arnautovic in his 25-man Premier League squad.

They are joined by Marc Muniesa, Erik Pieters and Oussame Assaidi.

All Barclays Premier League managers had to submit names to the authorities yesterday following the closure of the summer transfer window.

Rules state that clubs can have no more than 17 players who are not deemed to be ‘home grown’, but may have as many U-21 stars as they like.

The Premier League says: "A Home Grown player will be defined as one who, irrespective of his nationality or age, has been registered with any club affiliated to the Football Association or the Football Association of Wales for a period, continuous or not, of three entire seasons or 36 months prior to his 21st birthday (or the end of the season during which he turns 21)."

Changes can be made, however, when the window reopens again on January 1 2014.

And you can find out who features for Stoke City here:

25-man squad list (player name and whether they are ‘home grown’)

Adam, Charles Graham (No)

Arnautovic, Marko (No)

Assaidi, Oussama (No)

Begovic, Asmir (Yes)

Cameron, Geoff Scott (No)

Crouch, Peter James (Yes)

Edu, Maurice (No)

Etherington, Matthew (Yes)

Huth, Robert (Yes)

Jones, Kenwyne Joel (No)

Ness, Jamie (No)

Nzonzi, Steven Nkemboanza Mike Chr (No)

Palacios Suazo, Wilson Roberto (No)

Ireland, Stephen James (Yes)

Pennant, Jermaine Lloyd (Yes)

Pieters, Erik (No)

Shawcross, Ryan James (Yes)

Shea, Dane Brekken (No)

Sorensen, Thomas (No)

Walters, Jonathan Ronald (Yes)

Whelan, Glenn David (Yes)

Wilkinson, Andrew Gordon (Yes)

Wilson, Marc David (Yes)

Clive Rose

Under-21 players (Contract and Scholars)

Alabi, James

Bachmann, Daniel

Banks, Lewis

Barrington, Marcel

Butland, Jack

Campbell, James Andrew

Coban, Yusuf

Cook, Jake Benjamin

Coulson, Samuel Philip

Dawson, Lucas Jay

Douglas, Kelvin Isaac

Edwards, Liam

Eve, Dale Donald

Glasgow, Benjamin Luke

Gomez Nieto, Kevin

Grant, Alexander Ian

Gyollai, Daniel

Heneghan, Benjamin John

Hulme, Joseph Andrew

Keane, Jordan Michael

Lecygne, Eddy

Makrillos, Peter

Monlouis, Keiran Dion

Muniesa Martinez, Marc

Nardiello, Jack Barrie

O’Reilly, Ryan

Pickerill, Lee

Renee Pringle, Johnville Isaacs Joseph

Richards, Derice

Richardson, Jordan

Ricketts Hopkinson, Nathan Alton

Roberts, Oliver James

Rossi, Karim

Sanders, Edward James

Shields, Ryan Joseph

Strong, Curtis

Taylor, Joel

Thomas, Adam Christopher

Vassell, Theo Gary Carlstan

Ward, Charlie

Waring, George Philip

Watkins Clark, Mason Bradley

Westley, Samuel Edward

Weston Hayles, Charles Anthony Noel

Wheeler, Elliot Peter

Alan Hansen quitting Match of the Day after the 2014 World Cup

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Alan Hansen has confirmed he will quit his role as a Match of the Day pundit after the 2014 World Cup.

The former Liverpool defender has been with the BBC since 1992 but has decided not to extend his contract which expires after next summer’s showpiece in Brazil.

The announcement follows the Mirror story last month that the BBC were breaking up the “old boys’ club” of Hansen, Mark Lawrenson and Gary Lineker by putting new younger pundits on the highlight show.

Hansen, 58, said: “I’m retiring from Match of the Day at the end of the season. I will have been there for 22 years and will be 59, so it’s the right time for me.

“The guys at the BBC know me and I said, ‘Look, this is categorical. I’m leaving and nothing will make me change my mind’.

"I am contracted to do the World Cup and I will do that as it will be a good way to go out, but I have had a great run.

“I’ve been in football for 41 years and I’m going out right at the top, just as I did at Liverpool.

"The plan was always that I would retire at 55. I kept going, but I finally decided to retire during Euro 2012.

“I had just signed a two-year contract and felt that, by the end of it, I would have had enough.

"But I have worked for a great organisation with wonderful people on the most fantastic programme.”

In a new interview Hansen also said ITV tried to poach him four times for “fortunes” and he was offered the chance to manage Manchester City in 1995 by Francis Lee.

Alan says Des Lynam was the greatest presenter of MOTD adding: “Des was the best and is the best because he was just an unbelievable presenter.

"In the early days of Match of the Day I don’t think think I would have been working for 22 years had I gone on with another presenter because he was that good.

“I could say virtually anything to him and he would come back with a line.”

Hansen said his 1995 prediction “you won’t win anything with kids” aimed at Manchester United secured his career as a pundit.

He added: “The line pretty much made me simply because I got it so dramatically wrong,” he said.

Comments are back on football stories.

Premier League 25-man squad lists: see exactly who YOUR team has included

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Premier League sides have named their 25-man squad lists for the forthcoming season.

Arsenal have and also Nicklas Bendtner after he failed to secure a deadline-day move to Crystal Palace, while Manchester United .

All Premier League managers had to submit names to the authorities yesterday following the closure of the summer transfer window.

Rules state that clubs can have no more than 17 players who are not deemed to be ‘home grown’, but may have as many U-21 stars as they like.

The Premier League says: "A Home Grown player will be defined as one who, irrespective of his nationality or age, has been registered with any club affiliated to the Football Association or the Football Association of Wales for a period, continuous or not, of three entire seasons or 36 months prior to his 21st birthday (or the end of the season during which he turns 21)."

Changes can be made, however, when the window reopens again on January 1 2014.

Click on the teams below to see their full squads.

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England football team: Club, Country and why I don't care about watching England anymore – Jim Boardman

Christopher Lee

England play Moldova on Friday night and ITV will be hoping the nation, at least the English bit of it, are glued to the box to see if Roy Hodgson’s men can make some progress towards those World Cup finals in football’s other home, Brazil.

I’ll probably end up watching Celebrity Masterchef.

It never used to be like this.

I can remember those mornings after the night before, when the national bubble of euphoria had been burst after another penalty shoot-out failure. The feeling of despair heading into work; just about every radio station covering the glorious failure, just about everyone in work feeling the same.

Just about everyone you spoke to felt the same, even people who never normally watched football would be caught up in it, every step nearer the final having dragged more and more people into it being part of it all. And you really felt like you were part of it all, for the highs and the inevitable lows.

Of course that was during the finals. It wasn’t quite so intense for the qualifiers – those who don’t normally do football certainly don’t do it on cold November nights. But for the rest of us those qualifiers were still essential viewing, if only because the club football had been put on hold and we needed something else to talk about. You still felt like you were part of that.

Not any more.

ITV 

My Friday nights might not be as wild and exciting as they were years ago but I’m not sure I want to spend them with Adrian Chiles talking about Roy Hodgson. Especially not to a brass soundtrack of ‘the Great Escape’.

It doesn’t help that Roy Hodgson is England manager (we’ve got previous) but my interest in England had waned long before he got the job. It’s not down to Adrian Chiles all that much either – after all there’s always the mute button, which also helps with that band.

When a player gets injured for his club the commentator tells us what a worry it is for the England manager – yet when he gets injured for England there’s little thought of how it’s going to be a worry for his club manager. Players score winning goals in massive club games then afterwards the post-match interviews are all about how good it is for England that this player was finding his scoring form just at the right time. It’s like that big club match was little more than a warm up for the England match.

Most of the time the observations and questions are pretty harmless, after all there’s a limit to how many ways you can ask a player what it felt like to score that goal. But at times there’s a strong sense that England’s cheerleaders think of the Premier League as some sort of vulgar inconvenience.

The FA themselves show this attitude most of all.

AFP

Clubs ask England to go easy on a certain player, he’s carrying a bit of a strain and it’s only a friendly after all. England use the player for 88 minutes, until he’s stretchered off and out for weeks, that strain turning into a full-blown injury. He misses a stream of important games for his club because England felt their friendly was more important.

Players come back from international duty for other countries carrying injuries – but if the England circle had its way there’d be far less of those foreign players in the Premier League anyway. English clubs should use more English players, regardless of how good they are, for the sake of the English national side. Again, it’s an attitude that suggests club football is there purely as a feeder for the England squad, the warm-up to the main event.

I can’t remember the last time an England game felt like the main event. 

When Roy Hodgson turned up at Anfield on Sunday, only to find there was no padded seat reserved for him to sit in and no room at the buffet in the boardroom it was quite likely to be down to an oversight somewhere along the line. Liverpool found him somewhere to sit, somewhere to go at half-time and made sure he still got to see those players warming up for England in that minor low-key clash between Liverpool and Manchester United.

 

Yet the attitude from some of those England cheerleaders was that Liverpool had acted disgracefully and that some of those sponsors in that director’s box should have been turfed out to make way for the manager of England.

It’s unbelievably arrogant – unbelievable until you remember it’s just the England way.

It’ll be a shame if England don’t qualify for Brazil, especially for Steven Gerrard who will almost certainly have it down as his last international tournament, but maybe it would finally lead to a shake-up in attitudes at Wembley.

Maybe the old men in blazers would finally accept that club football is far more popular than their branch of the game, maybe they’ll show it some respect, work with it instead of looking down on it, in turn benefiting ‘Team England’.

Maybe then more of us will be able to start watching them again.

Poll loading … 

Ten worst football injuries: Wayne Rooney's forehead gash is bad, but what about these? – Mirror Football

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5) Eduardo – Birmingham v Arsenal, September 23, 2008   Almost exactly two years to the day before Ramsey’s horror injury, Eduardo suffered a terrible leg break following a tackle by Birmingham’s Martin Taylor. As well as breaking his left fibula, the striker’s injury was further complicate by an open dislocation of his let ankle.

Gunners boss Arsene Wenger initially called for Taylor to be banned for the challenge, although he later retracted those comments.

Recovery:  Eduardo was out for a week shy of a year before he returned in an FA Cup tie against Cardiff. In that match, he pulled a hamstring!

4) Petr Cech – Reading v Chelsea, October 14, 2006   Proving that it’s not just outfield players who are at risk when playing the beautiful game, Chelsea goalkeeper Cech nearly lost his life following a controversial challenge from Reading’s Stephen Hunt.

Cech was left severely concussed after being kneed in the head by the Irish midfielder and collapsed in the dressing room after being carried from the playing area.

Amid fears he had suffered a blood clot, the giant keeper was rushed to the Royal Berkshire Hospital where he underwent emergency surgery for a depressed fractured of the skull.

Recovery:   After originally being told he would be out of football for at least a year, Cech made a miraculous return to the Chelsea first team just three months later. The Czech stopper now wears a rugby-style head guard when playing that protects the areas of his skull weakened by the collision.

3) Alf Inge Haaland – Manchester United v Manchester City, April 21, 2001    Roy Keane’s knee-high horror lunge on the Norwegian in the Manchester derby earned him a red card, a five-game suspension and a £150,000 fine.

Keane later revealed in his autobiography that it was premeditated revenge after he suffered a season-ending injury while trying to foul Haaland, then at Leeds, in a match four years earlier.

Recovery:   After numerous attempts at a comeback, Haaland was forced to accept retirement in July 2003.

2) Patrick Battiston – France v West Germany, July 8, 1982   Midfielder Battiston was clean through on goal with only the keeper to beat in the second half of this World Cup semi-final match in Seville, when he was poleaxed by German stopper Harald Schumacher.

Not so much a challenge for the ball as an assault, Schumacher somehow managed to escape unpunished for an aerial bodycheck that left the French star in a coma.

Widely considered one of the most shocking fouls in footballing history, Battiston suffered damaged vertebrae, a broken jaw and the loss of four of his front teeth.

Recovery:   After his jaw was wired back into place, Battiston returned to work for his club Saint Etienne five months later.

1) David Busst – Manchester United v Coventry City, April 8, 1996   Arguably the most infamous of footballing injuries.

While the BBC and Sky refrained from showing the stomach-churning effects of the Coventry defender’s collision with Manchester United defender Denis Irwin, the look of horror on United keeper Peter Schmeichel’s face painted a vivid picture of just how serious the injury was.

Busst suffered a double compound fracture with the impact of the clash causing his cracked fibula bone to pierce the skin.

The match had to be delayed for 15 minutes while the blood was cleaned off the pitch at Old Trafford, while Schmeichel had to undergo counselling for a number of weeks following the incident.

Recovery:   Busst never played professionally again. Having faced the very real prospect of having his injured leg amputated, it’s likely he felt grateful for being at least able to walk.